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Events

Les Pastellistes 2017 - International

Our international exhibition, Les Pastellistes, 2017 edition, will be held from October 27th to November 5th, 2017, at Galerie 203. Instructions and form are available. Open to all!

5e Biennale Internationale du Pastel des Monts du Lyonnais

September 8th to 24th, 2017, Horizon Pastel presents its 5th International Pastel Biennial and the Pastel Society of Eastern Canada will be an Exceptional Guest.

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News

Colorado State University's online master's in arts leadership and cultural management is now accepting applications for fall admission. Click here for details.

L'Art du Pastel de Degas à Redon - An exhibition not to be missed in Paris from September 15, 2017 to April 8th, 2018.

Our Master Pastellist Bill Hosner is featured in an article on Outdoor Painter.

Ann Rochefort's painting, 'Red and Green' was accepted into the 29th IAPS Online Exhibition that is presently on exhibition.

"Le lac initiatique" by Danielle Richard (M.P), has been selected by the BUTLER INSTITUTE OF AMERICAN ART, Youngston, Ohio. USA. December 18th to February 19th 2017.

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Pastel characterists

Pastel sticks or crayons consist of pure powdered pigment combined with a binder. The exact composition and characteristics of an individual pastel stick depends on the type of pastel and the type and amount of binder used. It also varies by individual manufacturer.

Dry pastels have historically used binders such as arabic and tragacanth gum. Methyl cellulose was introduced as a binder in the twentieth century. Often a chalk or gypsum component is present. They are available in varying degrees of hardness, the softer varieties being wrapped in paper.

Dry pastel as a medium can be subdivided as follows:

  • Soft pastels: This is the most widely used form of pastel. The sticks have a higher portion of pigment and less binder, resulting in brighter colors. The drawing can be readily smudged and blended, but it results in a higher proportion of dust. Finished drawings made with soft pastels require protecting, either framing under glass or spraying with a fixative to prevent smudging.
  • Hard pastels: These have a higher portion of binder and less pigment, producing a sharp drawing material that is useful for fine details. These can be used with other pastels for drawing outlines and adding accents. However the colors are less brilliant than with soft pastels.
  • Pastel pencils: These are pencils with a pastel lead. They are useful for adding fine details.

 

In addition, new types of pastels have been produced:

  • Oil pastels: These have a soft, buttery consistency and intense colors. They are slightly more difficult to blend than soft pastels, but do not require a fixative.
  • Water-soluble pastels: These are similar to soft pastels, but contain a water-soluble component, such as glycol. This allows the colors to be thinned out using a water wash. There has been some debate within art societies as to what exactly counts as a pastel. The Pastel Society within the UK (the oldest pastel society) states the following are acceptable mediums for its exhibitions: "Pastels, including Oil pastel, Charcoal, Pencil, Conté, Sanguine, or any dry media". The emphasis appears to be on "dry media" but the debate continues.

 

Adapted from Wikipedia